For Christmas–Actor Work

Actor Work


An actor is preparing for opening night as is personal life is falling apart. When he learns that his wife is leaving him, he turns to drinking. Then, he loses the one thing that’s holding him together. Finally, through conversations with his director, his stage manager, and a long-time friend, he remembers his former source of strength in hard times. Can he find that strength again?

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:

“God is not dead: nor doth he sleep;

The wrong shall fail, the right pre-vail,

With peace on earth, good-will to men.”

–from “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day”

Approximately 20 minutes.

Needs for this performance:

Sound: One lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone if needed for space.

Lighting: General stage lighting in the center of the stage.

Stage and furniture: A small table to use as a makeup table and accompanying chair.

Begins on stage. Exits through stage door to finish.

For the Christmas Season–A Shepherd Remembers

Jesus compared himself to a shepherd.  What does that mean?  This scene between a shepherd and his grandchild considers what it means that Jesus was wrapped in clothes and laid in a manger, how his life changed as a result of meeting Jesus, and what it really means to be a Good Shepherd.

He told us how to find this Messiah.  He said that we would find him wrapped in cloths and laying in a manger.  I couldn’t believe it…God’s Messiah in an animal’s feeding trough?!

This scene gives a great opportunity for a child from your church to participate. The scene is perfect for boy or girl 8-12 years old. They would have some to memorize…mostly conversational. I would need one rehearsal, preferably the day before the performance. They would need a “traditional” shepherd’s costume that fits them.

Approximately 30 minutes.

Needs for this performance:

Sound:  Two lavalier or head-worn wireless microphones if needed for the space.  A sound technician available at least 1 hour before the service to go over sound cues played from either my mp3 player or a CD.

Lighting:  If stage lighting is available, three areas (left, center and one right) and, if available, one light up a central aisle for the beginning.  A lighting technician available 1 hour before the service to go over lighting cues.

Stage and furniture:  No special staging requirements.

Begins at the back of a central aisle.  Ends on stage.

For the Christmas Season–The Hope of Christmas

The Hope of Christmas


A lot of the characters we read about in the scripture’s Christmas stories had little reason to be hopeful. Whether it was Mary and Joseph, apparently expecting a child before they were married; the shepherds who were some of the lowest of the social strata of the day; or even the Wise Men or Magi who kept failing to find the promised Messiah. They, like us, had plenty of reasons for hopelessness but they, also like us, can take hope in the promised Messiah of the Old Testament and those prophesies’ fulfillment in the person of Jesus Christ.

This performance also has the possibility of including one of your actresses in the role of Mary.

Even when our world seems hopeless…there is hope that is promised in scripture.  Jesus’ birth did not just free the Israelites but his birth, life and death provides hope to all mankind. 

–from “The Hope of Christmas”

Approximately 25 minutes.

Needs for this performance:

Sound: One lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone if needed for space.
The PowerPoint I use also has sound tracks that play from the computer, if possible. These can also be done from a phone/tablet if needed by your setup

Lighting: General stage lighting in the center of the stage.

Computer: There is a PowerPoint Presentation which occurs during the performance and I will need a brief orientation time with your operator to communicate when those changes occur.

Begins and ends on stage.

Have You Ever Lost Anything?

I would bet that you and everyone you know has lost something sometime.  From the trivial (that toy car when you were 5) to the heartbreaking loss of a friend or relative and everything in between, loss can be difficult.

Yet I have found that God’s silence is an invitation to a spiritual doorway to perseverance and powerlessness—it is the way of the cross.

Mike Rakes–Surrendered and Unafraid

Have You Ever Lost Anything addresses loss.  Not just the fact that it happens, but that losing someone you love does not mean that you’ve failed as

  • a Christian
  • a pray-er
  • or in any other way…

it just means that you and your loved one are human.

Needs for this performance:

Sound:  A lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone.

Lighting:  If stage lighting is available, four general lighting areas (three downstage and one large area upstage) with two colors each (warm and cool such as Amber and Blue) are desired.

Stage and furniture:  A chair.

Performance begins and ends on stage.

For Communion Sunday–The Living Lord’s Supper

The Living Lord’s Supper

Prior to having the Last Supper with His disciples, Jesus washed their feet. What was going through his mind as he came to each disciple? We see very little dialogue between him and his disciples during this very private moment.

Perhaps he was thinking through how he found each of them. His first encounter. A particular time, while they were traveling with him, when they really “got it.” So many things to consider.

Jude asked how anyone could be saved.  I told him that only God could save people…with man it is impossible.

“The Living Lord’s Supper”

This presentation, which ideally would be included with a communion service, shows Jesus as he considers all of the things that each disciple brought to his ministry. It includes Jesus distributing the elements to the congregation and taking them through the communion service.

Needs for this performance:

Sound:  A lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone.

Lighting:  General lighting for both the stage and audience space.

Stage and furniture:  A small table with the communion elements.

As there is video involved, I would need a short meeting with the computer/powerpoint operator to walk them through the changes needed throughout the drama.

Entry and exit is through the aisle.

For Your Pastor Appreciation Service or Banquet–The Children’s Pastor Interview

The Children’s Pastor Interview

Our Bible heroes have some interesting backstories.  For some of them, despite their faith and love for God, many of them would probably be passed over for jobs in our modern churches.  Noah, Moses, Elijah, Rahab, David, Paul, Samson, Jonah and Judas…they all make an “appearance” in this comic drama about how hard it can be to find just the right person for the new Children’s Pastor.

So, God himself gave you the law.  Who was keeping up with the Israelites while you were doing that?  Joshua.  Was he one of your trainees?  How did he do?  I see…so they put all of their gold together and melted it down and formed it into a calf to worship.  And Joshua approved of this?  What did you do to bring them back into line?

Pastor

This presentation takes a humorous look at our normal “requirements” for ministry and how many of our favorite Bible characters just don’t measure up.

Needs for this performance:

Sound:  A lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone.

Lighting:  Only general stage lighting is needed.

Stage and furniture:  A small table or desk in the center of the stage with two chairs (preferably padded).

Performance begins and ends on stage.

Peter

Peter

Peter’s story is one that allows us a first-hand view of what it means to be both human and a servant of Jesus. Each of these presentations follows Peter from the triumphal entry through Jesus’ resurrection. Both also include communion which can be done with the congregation if desired.

Jesus told us He was going to die.  He told us He would be spit on.  He told us He would be flogged.  But then he said he would rise again, remember?

Peter–“The Power of Easter”

The Peter presentation is available in two formats:

  • A singular presentation which follows Peter from the Triumphal Entry to the Resurrection–Approximately 30 minutes.
  • A three-part presentation (originally done on Palm Sunday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday).
    • The Promise of Easter–Immediately following the Triumphal Entry–Approximately 5 minutes.
    • The Passion of Easter–Peter looks back on the Passion Week from immediately following Jesus’ Arrest.  Includes congregational communion–Approximately 15-20 minutes.
    • The Power of Easter–Peter wakes up early on Sunday morning.  Peter, John and Matthew reflect back on their life with Jesus–Approximately 10 minutes.

Needs for this performance:

Sound:  A lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone.  A sound technician available at least 1 hour before the service to go over sound cues played from either my mp3 player or a CD.

Lighting:  Depends on whether single part of three-part is selected.  I will communicate desires after scheduling the performance.  A lighting technician available at least 1 hour before the service to go over basic lighting cues.

Stage and furniture:  If three-part is selected, a small table (about 18″ by 36″) for the communion elements for the second part.  Three cubes or other seats for third part.
If singular performance, only a small table is needed (about 18″ by 36″) for communion elements for Allen.

For three part, the first part begins at the back of a central aisle.  The other two begin and all three end on stage.

For singular performance, both beginning and ending is in a central aisle.

For Pentecost Sunday–Through the Eyes of John

Through the Eyes of John

Sometimes known as John the Apostle, John the Beloved, or John the Revelator.  No matter how you refer to him, John’s contributions to the New Testament were written to find deep relationships.  This presentation combines parts from the Gospel of John, Acts, John’s Epistles and the Revelation into a stirring narrative from this Beloved Disciple of Jesus.  

However, it wasn’t just the things Jesus did that was impressive, but the things He said too.

–John–“Through the Eyes of John”

The presentation includes an on-stage transformation from John the Apostle to the Elderly John the Revelator.

Needs for this performance:

Sound:  A lavalier (not head-worn) wireless microphone.  A sound technician available at least 1 hour before the service to go over sound cues played from either my mp3 player or a CD.

Lighting:  If stage lighting is available, three general lighting areas (two downstage and one large area upstage) with two colors each (warm and cool such as Amber and Blue) are desired.  Also desired is one light shining up one of the central aisles for the beginning.  A lighting technician available at least 1 hour before the service to go over basic lighting cues.

Stage and furniture:  A small table (at least 18″x36″) toward the front on one side with one chair (preferably padded).

Performance entrance is through a central aisle.  Ending is on stage.

Coming Soon: I Survived

Depression and mental health is one of the biggest issues facing teens in the United States. The suicide rate for people aged 10 to 24 increased 56% between 2007 and 2017. During that same time frame, the suicide rate tripled for ages 10-14 and increased by 76% for ages 15-19 (data available here).

This story takes the audience through the life story of one person who dealt with depression, self-harm and even attempted suicide. Through the drama, details are given about what could be going on with students or their friends as they deal with depression. In the end, it’s a concerned friend, not afraid to speak up, that brings healing. Emphasis is given to speaking up for friends and removing the stigma so often associated with mental illness.

Anticipated Needs for this performance:

Sound: One lavalier or head-worn wireless microphone if needed for space.  There is one short voice-over track, from CD or phone/tablet, that plays at the beginning.

Lighting: General stage lighting in the center of the stage.

Stage and furniture: A small table to use as a desk and accompanying chair.

Begins and ends on stage